Friday, 28 July 2017

Weekend Blog Hops: 29 July 2017

http://www.coffeeaddictedwriter.com/2017/01/book-blogger-hop-january-13th-19th.html
Do you read tie-in novels to movies or television series?
For this question, I am going to assume that it only means novels written specifically for the film/TV series and not movie tie-in editions of previously published books. To that end, I would say that I do so on occasion. If I particularly loved a film or TV show that might prompt me to purchase related books. Off the top of my head, ones that I have read include Crimson Peak, Van Helsing, and the Heroes and Heroes: Reborn novel/novellas. A little different, but I will also often buy 'making-of' books, especially for films such as Lord of the Rings. Some tie-in books I don't yet have but would like to read are the three short novels relating to The Originals--if only because I love Elijah Mikaelson so much! *wink*



http://www.rosecityreader.com/ http://www.fredasvoice.com/


Opening sentence:
There are many good reasons for visiting Lyme Regis.






From page 56:
For country-house visitors the pursuit of culture is a less powerful motive than basic human curiosity.





My Current Read 
The Englishman's England
Ian Ousby

In this fascinating and original study Ian Ousby investigates the landmarks chosen by the English for their leisure travel over the centuries. He looks in particular at four types of attraction still prominent on the tourist map of England: literary shrines, country houses, picturesque ruins and the natural landscape. All these first became objects of fashionable attention during the eighteenth century, when improvements in transport combined with a spirit of practical inquiry to breed the first generation of travellers who called themselves ‘tourists’.

Drawing on a wide range of sources - journals, travel books and guidebooks, novels and poems, as well as many engravings – Ian Ousby traces the canons of taste which led the early tourists to seek out places like Stratford-upon-Avon, Chatsworth, Tintern Abbey and the Lake District, and records the stages by which these places acquired the trappings of the tourist attraction. Above all, he shows the development not just of an industry but of a state of mind marked, from its earliest phase, by the underlying fear that tourism is fated to spoil or even destroy the very thing it most admires.

32 comments:

  1. This doesn't seem like it's for me but that is quite an interesting concept for a book! I hope you enjoy it or have enjoyed it. Enjoy your weekend!

    Danica @ Shelves of Spines
    My Friday Meme

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  2. Sounds interesting. This week I have an urban fantasy novel - Blood Gamble by Melissa F. Olson. Happy reading!

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  3. Not my usual read, but I hope you are loving it. Thanks for sharing...and for visiting my blog.

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    1. It was an interesting read, thanks. Happy Hopping!

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  4. You have me wanting more! :-) Happy weekend!

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  5. I like to read this sort of book. You never know what interesting tidbits you might find.

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    1. Same here, and this one certainly offered some interesting insights.

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  6. This isn't the type of book I'd normally pick up, but I imagine it's filled with lots of interesting information. Happy reading! :)

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    1. Yes, it was an interesting read. Happy Hopping!

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  7. This sounds really interesting! I'm curious to see what places are mentioned. Hope you're enjoying it!

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    1. I did, thanks. Interesting to learn when/how certainly tourist spots became popular.

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  8. I like the sound of your current read. The book is new to me, but I'm interested. I love reading both British mysteries and literary fiction, so this fits my interests. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Margot. Happy Hopping.

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  9. I probably wouldn't read this but it does sound fascinating. Wold be a great documentary. That I'd watch:)

    My Friday 56 from Refuge For Masterminds

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  10. This sounds like a well-researched book. Hope you enjoy your current read and that you have a wonderful weekend!

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  11. I need to get my hands on the Heroes and Heroes: Reborn novel/novellas!

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    1. They aren't the best-written works, but for a fan of the show they're great. :)

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  12. I may not read tie-in novels but I actually do enjoy picking up the 'making of...' books of certain films - I always find them quite exciting to go through!

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    1. Yes, making-of books can be awesome.

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  13. I love making of books too! I didn't think about those being book tie-ins! 😁💡♥️

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    1. Yes, I often enjoy them, too, particularly when the film/show involves a lot of special effects and visual effects.

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  14. Great blog hop answer and I totally did interpreted the blog hop question in different way, but thank you so much for passing by my blog hop Nicki.

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  15. So sorry for the late comment back, Nicki....:( I've been a little TOO busy lately, lol. Well, here I am now!

    I had the same impression about tie-ins that you did. So I went to Wikipedia, and saw that this term refers to books based on movies and TV series, and not the other way around. However, I have seen editions of already existing books referred to as "tie-ins" if they have photos or art from movies based on those books. A case in point: the three volumes of The Lord of the Rings. There are a couple of editions that have covers featuring photos from the movies, and they're referred to as "tie-in editions". Scratching my head here, lol.

    Well, anyway.... I've heard of "Crimson Peak", and, of course, "Van Helsing", but have not watched them. As for "Heroes", and "Heroes:Reborn", I will have to check them out.

    Thanks for dropping by and commenting on my BBH post!! Have a good one!! <3 :)

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    1. Yes, Maria. Yes, they do sometimes refer to books as film tie-in editions too. Have a great end to the week.

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  16. I didn't know that there was a Crimson Peak tie in novel - I may have to look for it! :)

    Lauren @ Always Me

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    1. It's average quality, but good if you enjoyed the film. If you've not seen it, I *do* highly recommend the making-of book for Crimson Peak; it's so beautiful.

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